Pesco 777 Power Pack: A Close Look

Attention: Welcome to our new aircraft hydraulics section! We hope you find this section we have put together informative and interesting. You may notice that some part numbers and so forth are blurred out. One reason we didn’t want to post full part numbers because it has taken us months of searches to get the information we have. It wouldn’t be fair to us to just give up our hard work and research. Not too many people know about this stuff and the ones that do don’t want to talk about it. We feel this is just the right amount of info so we don’t upset anyone on either side. The biggest reason for not giving out full part numbers is because we don’t need every lowrider to call up aircraft surplus places looking for things. Most warehouses don’t want to sell to lowriders and the ones that do are raising their prices beyond a reasonable amount because people are willing to pay to much for stuff the warehouse considers junk. Lets keep prices down and think about it before you offer a insane amount for a used pump that needs a rebuild. If you are going to track parts down don’t say that it is for a lowrider. Know what the full part number is, what aircraft it goes in, the proper name for the part and the function of that part. Take the time to research the surplus industry and know the lingo they use. Remember not to use lowrider lingo when talking with them because odds are they have a different term for the part you are looking for. With a little research and some luck you’ll be able to find what you need.

The 777 is a very popular pump for lowriders. Some of these pumps come from the 1930’s. It is smaller than the popular 280 unit. The motor on a 777 unit is around 3.5 HP and the pump output pressure is around 1000 PSI. This a is good pump for a four pump hydraulic system. We’ve seen some of these units on Ebay but be careful as they may not be tested. We highly recommend getting your pumps from ROLLINAROUND’S Hydraulic Supply, all pumps are checked over and motors are tested..

A Pesco 777 hydraulic power pack with Hydro-Aire valve.

A Pesco 777 hydraulic power pack with Hydro-Aire valve.

The Pesco 777 is smaller than the Pesco 280 unit.

The Pesco 777 is smaller than the Pesco 280 unit.

A used surplus Pesco 777 hydraulic pump and motor.

A used surplus Pesco 777 hydraulic pump and motor.

Here are six used 777 units with two more on the way.

Here are six used 777 units with two more on the way.

Here are six used 777 units from a better angle.

Here are six used 777 units from a better angle.

Here is a unit from the back.

Here is a unit from the back.

A close up of the pump.

A close up of the pump.

Pesco 777

The pump data plate.

Pesco 777 plate

Close up of the data plate on pump.

Pesco 777 motor data plate

The motor data plate.

Some tags on the the pumps from a past over haul.

Some tags on the the pumps from a past over haul.

A larger Pesco 280 pump and a small Pesco 777 pump on the right.

A larger Pesco 280 pump and a small Pesco 777 pump on the right.

Used Pesco 777 Power Pack: Clean Up

This section covers the clean up of our used 777 units we got from surplus storage.

We removed the four bolts holding the pump to the motor and carefully pulled the two apart.

We removed the four bolts holding the pump to the motor and carefully pulled the two apart.

This is the rear flange of the pump. You can use a 3/8 drive ratchet to check the pump by spinning it.

This is the rear flange of the pump. You can use a 3/8 drive ratchet to check the pump by spinning it.

Close detail of the motor flange.

Close detail of the motor flange.

The Pesco 777 motor is smaller than a Prestolite motor on right.

The Pesco 777 motor is smaller than a Prestolite motor on right.

A fitting is stuck in this pump and we can't get it out. We didn't want to damage the pump trying to remove the fitting.

A fitting is stuck in this pump and we can’t get it out. We didn’t want to damage the pump trying to remove the fitting.

We filled the pump ports with PB Blaster overnight to help free the fitting.

We filled the pump ports with PB Blaster overnight to help free the fitting.

The pumps were taken off the motors to make clean up easy.

The pumps were taken off the motors to make clean up easy.

The DC motors will need some work.

The DC motors will need some work.

This DC motor looks in very good shape inside. The brushes appear to have a good amount left to them. The motor is cleaned out with electrical solvent cleaner to get rid of brush dust.

This DC motor looks in very good shape inside. The brushes appear to have a good amount left to them. The motor is cleaned out with electrical solvent cleaner to get rid of brush dust.

Here is some of the hardware from the motor. Everything will be cleaned and sanded for paint.

Here is some of the hardware from the motor. Everything will be cleaned and sanded for paint.

The DC motor is repainted in a high gloss black finish.

The DC motor is repainted in a high gloss black finish.

 The DC motor gets the pump mounted back on it.

The DC motor gets the pump mounted back on it.

Pesco777CleanedUp-2

Pesco 777 along with Hydro-Aire valve.

Pesco 777 along with Hydro-Aire valve.

Another picture of Pesco 777 along with Hydro-Aire valve.

Another picture of Pesco 777 along with Hydro-Aire valve.

One of our Pesco units in display case.

One of our Pesco units in display case.

Used Pesco 777 Pump: A Look Inside

Warning: Do Not Take Your Pesco Pump Apart As It May Cause A Problem In The Pump!

This section is for educational purposes to explain the inner workings of these pumps.

Below we are going to take a Pesco pump apart for inspection. Pesco pumps are a gear pump so they are fairly simple in how they operate. You’ll need a few simple tools to take the pump apart. You will need wire cutters, needle nose pliers and a 7/16 open end wrench.

The lock wires are cut on the eight castle nuts on the back of the pump. You will notice that you can't back one of the nuts around the flange off because the studs are too long. Carefully pull apart the front half and back half of the pump and you'll be able to get the nut off. Be careful not to damage the paper gasket in between where you take the pump apart.

The lock wires are cut on the eight castle nuts on the back of the pump. You will notice that you can’t back one of the nuts around the flange off because the studs are too long. Carefully pull apart the front half and back half of the pump and you’ll be able to get the nut off. Be careful not to damage the paper gasket in between where you take the pump apart.

You can see that this pump is very similar to a Fenner pump inside. It works on the same principle as modern pumps.

You can see that this pump is very similar to a Fenner pump inside. It works on the same principle as modern pumps.

The front half of the pump with the paper gasket still intact. Notice the lack of roller bearings, this pump uses friction bearings.

The front half of the pump with the paper gasket still intact. Notice the lack of roller bearings, this pump uses friction bearings.

 Here is the pump with a gear out. The gears slide right out with your fingers.

Here is the pump with a gear out. The gears slide right out with your fingers.