Custom Tweed Door Panels

By Josh of Eternal Rollerz TN Chapter

We would like to thank Josh from our TN Chapter for contributing to this article and sharing pictures for the tech page. Thanks Bro! Lets take a close look on how Josh covered his Lincoln door panels with tweed.

Materials needed: scissors, spray glue, razor blade, twine, tape measure, tweed ( any color ) and of course a Pepsi, or beer it's your choice!

Materials needed: scissors, spray glue, razor blade, twine, tape measure, tweed ( any color ) and of course a Pepsi, or beer it’s your choice!

Step 1: Take off the door panel carefully and do not break any clips on the back of the door panel.

Step 1: Take off the door panel carefully and do not break any clips on the back of the door panel.


Above: Step 2: Remove all the trim parts from the door panel. They will have clips or small bolts and nuts. Keep count of all of your parts. Be extremely careful not to break any metal clips.


Step 3: Clean the door panel with a good surface cleaner or paint thinner diluted with water. Wipe until dry before test fitting the fabric over the panel.

Step 4: Lay your fabric over the door panel and cut about 5-9 extra inches of fabric all the way around the panel. This will ensure that the panel is done with one nice piece.

Step 4: Lay your fabric over the door panel and cut about 5-9 extra inches of fabric all the way around the panel. This will ensure that the panel is done with one nice piece.

Step 5: Cut and glue the bottom corner of the fabric to the panel. Spray the glue on the panel and wait for the glue to tack up.This will prevent the glue from bleeding through the fabric.

Step 5: Cut and glue the bottom corner of the fabric to the panel. Spray the glue on the panel and wait for the glue to tack up.This will prevent the glue from bleeding through the fabric.


Above: Step 6: Josh wanted flames on his door panels. Twine is used to make the patterns by gluing it in the desired design. You can also use thicker twine but in this application a almost unnoticeable flame effect was desired.


Above: Step 7: Spray the glue over the patterns and the panel. Allow to tack up and put tweed over the door panel. You may have to cut some slits in the fabric to allow the tweed to fit the contours of the panel properly.

Step 8: Trim off the extra fabric and glue from the back of the panel.

Step 8: Trim off the extra fabric and glue from the back of the panel.

Step 9: Put the trim back on. It was left off of these panels to match the slick shaved look of the exterior of Josh's Lincoln.

Step 9: Put the trim back on. It was left off of these panels to match the slick shaved look of the exterior of Josh’s Lincoln.

The insert was done in white to match the exterior of the car.

The insert was done in white to match the exterior of the car.

Tweed—————————————$50.00

Spray Glue———————————–$6.99

24oz Pepsi————————————$1.30

TELLING UPHOLSTERY SHOP TO F–K OFF—- PRICELESS!